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Malik Extralight

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Extralight Italic

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Light

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Light Italic

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Book

FREE

Malik Book Italic

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Regular

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Italic

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Medium

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Medium Italic

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Bold

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Bold Italic

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Extrabold

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Extrabold Italic

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Heavy Display

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Malik Heavy Display Italic

Start from 29 ($ 35.6)
The conversion euro/dollar is updated every day using 'European Central Bank (www.ecb.europa.eu)' exchange rate. Paypal can apply a different exchange rate

Available Formats

Desktop Licenses

B
N

Extended Licenses

G
A
M
L

Scripts supported

Sans Serif Typefamily by Andrea Tartarelli / 2020
Taking its name from the arabic word for "king", Malik is a flared sans serif typeface family designed in 2020 by Andrea Tartarelli. The designer wanted to find a way to bridge the classical letterforms of Roman Old Style typefaces with the readability of contemporary sans typefaces. This was achieved by using the so-called flared serif that emerges gradually from the stem of the letter, ending in a sharp angle. It's something that also reminds of the peculiar shapes of the Simoncini Method, invented by italian type designer  SHOW ALL

Taking its name from the arabic word for "king", Malik is a flared sans serif typeface family designed in 2020 by Andrea Tartarelli. The designer wanted to find a way to bridge the classical letterforms of Roman Old Style typefaces with the readability of contemporary sans typefaces. This was achieved by using the so-called flared serif that emerges gradually from the stem of the letter, ending in a sharp angle. It's something that also reminds of the peculiar shapes of the Simoncini Method, invented by italian type designer Francesco Simoncini to get a sharper definition of letterforms. To this blend of classical elegance and modernist expertise, Malik adds the calligraphic influence of modern masters like Frederic Goudy or Ed Benguiat, visible in signature details like the reverse contrast uppercase B, or the calligraphic lowercase k.

Malik also means "owner", and this font surely wants to rule the page. It manages to be extremely readable when used in body text size, but looks surprising and expressive in display use. The inclusion of the Malik Heavy Display weight, with its black texture balanced by deep inktraps, allows for striking logo design. The weight range of the family is extremely wide, including a Book alternative to the Regular weight for fine-tuning readability, a range of light display weights and a solid choice of bold weights for branding, all coming with matching true italics. The 16 cuts of Malik have been equipped with all the features you need to solve your editorial and design challenges, including a wide language coverage (thanks to over one thousand latin and cyrillic characters) and a complete set of open type features (including small capitals, positional numbers, case sensitive forms). Alternate characters and stylistic sets allow you to fine-tune your editorial and branding design by choosing variant letter shapes.

Malik is the typeface for everyone who wants to design like a king...or like he doesn't care who the king is!

SUPPORT 218 LANGUAGES  SHOW ALL HIDE ALL English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Russian, German, Javanese (Latin), Vietnamese, Turkish, Italian, Polish, Afaan Oromo, Azeri, Tagalog, Sundanese (Latin), Filipino, Moldovan, Romanian, Indonesian, Dutch, Cebuano, Igbo, Malay, Uzbek (Latin), Kurdish (Latin), Swahili, Hungarian, Czech, Haitian Creole, Hiligaynon, Afrikaans, Somali, Zulu, Serbian, Swedish, Bulgarian, Shona, Quechua, Albanian, Catalan, Chichewa, Ilocano, Kikongo, Kinyarwanda, Neapolitan, Xhosa, Tshiluba, Slovak, Danish, Gikuyu, Finnish, Norwegian, Sicilian, Sotho (Southern), Kirundi, Tswana, Sotho (Northern), Belarusian (Latin), Turkmen (Latin), Bemba, Lombard, Lithuanian, Tsonga, Wolof, Jamaican, Dholuo, Galician, Ganda, Low Saxon, Waray-Waray, Makhuwa, Bikol, Kapampangan (Latin), Aymara, Zarma, Ndebele, Slovenian, Tumbuka, Venetian, Genoese, Piedmontese, Swazi, Zazaki, Latvian, Nahuatl, Silesian, Bashkir (Latin), Sardinian, Estonian, Afar, Cape Verdean Creole, Maasai, Occitan, Tetum, Oshiwambo, Basque, Welsh, Chavacano, Dawan, Montenegrin, Walloon, Asturian, Kaqchikel, Ossetian (Latin), Zapotec, Frisian, Guadeloupean Creole, Q’eqchi’, Karakalpak (Latin), Crimean Tatar (Latin), Sango, Luxembourgish, Samoan, Maltese, Tzotzil, Fijian, Friulian, Icelandic, Sranan, Wayuu, Papiamento, Aromanian, Corsican, Breton, Amis, Gagauz (Latin), Māori, Tok Pisin, Tongan, Alsatian, Atayal, Kiribati, Seychellois Creole, Võro, Tahitian, Scottish Gaelic, Chamorro, Greenlandic (Kalaallisut), Kashubian, Faroese, Rarotongan, Sorbian (Upper Sorbian), Karelian (Latin), Romansh, Chickasaw, Arvanitic (Latin), Nagamese Creole, Saramaccan, Ladin, Kaingang, Palauan, Sami (Northern Sami), Sorbian (Lower Sorbian), Drehu, Wallisian, Aragonese, Mirandese, Tuvaluan, Xavante, Zuni, Montagnais, Hawaiian, Marquesan, Niuean, Yapese, Vepsian, Bislama, Hopi, Megleno-Romanian, Creek, Aranese, Rotokas, Tokelauan, Mohawk, Onĕipŏt, Warlpiri, Cimbrian, Sami (Lule Sami), Jèrriais, Arrernte, Murrinh-Patha, Kala Lagaw Ya, Cofán, Gwich’in, Seri, Sami (Southern Sami), Istro-Romanian, Wik-Mungkan, Anuta, Cornish, Sami (Inari Sami), Yindjibarndi, Noongar, Hotcąk (Latin), Meriam Mir, Manx, Shawnee, Gooniyandi, Ido, Wiradjuri, Hän, Ngiyambaa, Delaware, Potawatomi, Abenaki, Esperanto, Folkspraak, Interglossa, Interlingua, Latin, Latino sine Flexione, Lojban, Novial, Occidental, Old Icelandic, Old Norse, Slovio (Latin), Volapük

Weights

  • C
    Extralight
  • C
    Light
  • C
    Book
  • C
    Regular
  • C
    Medium
  • C
    Bold
  • C
    Extrabold
  • C
    Heavy Display
  • C
    Variable

Features

  • fi fl
    Standard Ligatures
  • ¿H?
    Case-Sensitive Forms
  • ABCDE
    Small Capitals From Capitals
  • fk fb
    Discretionary Ligatures
  • ag
    Stylistic Alternates
  • Rag
    Small Capitals
  • BPR
    Stylistic Set 1
  • JUy
    Stylistic Set 2
  • tw
    Stylistic Set 3
  • x
    Stylistic Set 4
  • 1/2
    Fractions
  • 1o2a
    Ordinals
  • 123
    Oldstyle Figures
  • 1234
    Tabular Figures
  • 123
    Alternate Annotation Forms
  • H123
    Denominators
  • H123
    Subscript
  • H123
    Superscript
  • H123
    Scientific Inferiors
  • H123
    Numerators

Variable Typefaces

beta

Malik Variable

VARIABLE FONTS ARE IN BETA VERSION, AVAILABLE ONLY WITH THE FULL FAMILY PACKAGE

Features
TIPS: CLICK ON TEXT TO EDIT

European languages

Features
TIPS: CLICK ON TEXT TO EDIT

The European languages are members of the same family. Their separate existence is a myth. For science, music, sport, etc, Europe uses the same vocabulary.

Features
TIPS: CLICK ON TEXT TO EDIT

The languages only differ in their grammar, their pronunciation and their most common words. Everyone realizes why a new common language would be desirable: one could refuse to pay expensive translators. To achieve this, it would be necessary to have uniform grammar, pronunciation and more common words. If several languages coalesce, the grammar of the resulting language is more simple and regular than that of the individual languages. The new common language will be more simple and regular than the existing European languages. It will be as simple as Occidental; in fact, it will be Occidental. To an English person, it will seem like simplified English, as a skeptical Cambridge friend of mine told me what Occidental is. The European languages are members of the same family. Their separate existence is a myth. For science, music, sport, etc, Europe uses the same vocabulary. The languages only differ in their grammar, their pronunciation and their most common words. Everyone realizes why a new common language would be desirable: one could refuse to pay expensive translators. To achieve this, it would be necessary to have uniform grammar, pronunciation and more common words. If several languages coalesce, the grammar of the resulting language is more simple and regular than that of the individual languages. The new common language will be more simple and regular than the existing European languages. It will be as simple as Occidental; in fact, it will be Occidental. To an English person, it will seem like simplified English, as a skeptical Cambridge friend of mine told me what Occidental is. The European languages are members of the same family. Their separate existence is a myth. For science, music, sport, etc, Europe uses the same vocabulary.

Unicode Charset:

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